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King Valley Aquaponics

King Valley Aquaponics

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Aquaponics MASTER CLASS

We could not recommend this course enough for anyone who is interested in getting in to aquaponics or wants to increase there skills set. Both Kaylene and I both loved the course.

"Murray and his team will help you make your commercial Aquaponics dream a reality.
This course will equip you with a working understanding of operating systems and farm design.
You will know how to budget and financially plan your future Aquaponics farm.

You will have a clear step by step marketing plan for your farm produce.
Just what makes Aquaponics work so well will be clearly explained.

No more hunting around looking at dozens of You Tube clips, trolling through forums, reading endless blogs to try and glean the information necessary to plan and make your Aquaponic farm a reality. The information is right here in this 4 day Future Farms MASTER CLASS course. So much poor quality information out there and how are you supposed to be able to tell which is good and which is just plain made up spin."

Sign up for their September course on their webite - http://www.aquaponics.net.au/master-classes.html

Mouse Melons

Kissin’ cousins to cucumbers, Mexican mouse melons pack a flavorful wallop despite their Lilliputian size.

Its unique flavor, with hints of cucumber and green fava bean, its pest-free and rampant habit of growth, not to mention its huge productivity, all conspire to recommend this unusual vine to home gardeners looking for something new to add to their menus.

The melon’s most common name in Spanish is “sandíita” (little watermelon), but it has a slew of other monikers in local dialects and Native American languages, many of which translate as “mouse melon.” These colloquial names are not surprising because the fruits resemble superminiaturized watermelons, the perfect scale for a mouse-sized picnic.

The scientific name of this plant is Melothria scabra. It is native to Mexico and Central America, and was first described scientifically in 1866 by the French botanist Charles Victor Naudin. I should add in the same breath that Naudin’s Latin nomenclature for the melon is not engraved in stone because there is quite a bit of argument as to where this plant belongs by botanical classification, especially because it has very close relatives in Africa.

If botanists have been late in coming to terms with the mouse melon, Native American peoples have not. It has been a staple of Mexican and Central American diets since pre-Columbian times, hence its great array of names in indigenous languages. These people also use the melon in nonculinary ways, including in medicine, yet little of this information can be found in mainstream literature.

Mouse melons are terrific in stir-fries; they can be pickled just like French gherkins, eaten raw in salads or put up like Polish dill pickles. They also can be chopped and added to salsas for extra texture and flavor.

How to Grow Them

Growing mouse melons is no hassle at all. We strongly advise creating a wire cage or trellis, because the vines will climb as high as 10 feet. Best of all, the plants will continue to fruit until the first frost. Having grown the melons for several years now, we also can attest that the plants are fairly drought-resistant, more so than cucumbers. And nothing — not even birds — has attacked the fruit. You also may discover that the plants reseed themselves freely, but letting them run over the ground is not the best way to cultivate them because this invites slug damage.

TIME TO PLANT GARLIC - Here is how.

Garlic... why grow your own?

Because it's healthier! Imported garlic in supermarkets has been sprayed with nasty chemicals to lengthen it's shelf life and prevent it from sprouting.

Plant a mixture of hard and softneck garlic in your own backyard and your efforts will be rewarded with chemical free garlic all year round.

We have hand selected a range of Pink, Purlple, and White garlic from local Garlic growers all avaible at the markets we attend.

Garlic is best planted in autumn and harvested in late spring and summer. Ask us more about garlic at your local farmers market.

Australian grown garlic, especially specialist varieties of garlic, are limited in numbers, so be quick!

 

Some of our Easy-to-Grow herbs

Herbs are best in their own garden. The closer you can locate this to the kitchen the better — when you want a sprig of mint or couple of herbs for a "rainy day stew," you'll find you just won't want to bother getting the herbs if they're located too far away

  • ANISE: Annual. 75 days. Eight inches. Always grow from seed, don't transplant. Uses: fresh leaves in salad and as a garnish. Good with fish. Seeds: in bread, cake, stew, soups, candy. Medicinal: tea.

 

  • BASIL: Sweet: 85 days. Annual one to 1 and a half feet. Germinates easily in 4 or 5 days — if tops are pinched off plants will bush. Spacing: 15 inches for regular, 6 inches dwarf varieties. In harvesting, when buds appear use both leaves and buds, cut part way to ground for a second crop. Uses: in soups, meat, some salads. Tie in bunches, dry in sun, store.

 

  • BORAGE: Annual (self-sowing). 80 days. Grows 1-1/2 feet. Blue flowers attract bees. Should not be transplanted. Uses: tender leaves are used in salads and to flavor lemonade and other cool drinks, cooked, in pickles. Flower is candied for confection.

 

  • CARAWAY: Grows 1-1/2 to 2 feet. 70 days. Biennial seed; planted one year for harvest the next. Plants to stand 8 inches apart. Cultivate first year. When seed clusters ripen second year, snip plants a foot above ground, dry on old cloth a few days, then thresh seeds by slapping with a small stick. Blow off chaff and store in a tight jar. Early ripening seeds may be planted to give a crop the next year. Uses: in breads, cakes, candies, cabbage, soup and salads, in Sauerkraut, goulash, baked apples.

 

  • CHIVES: Perennial. Six inches. Seeds germinate slowly. Clumps may be divided in spring. Uses: leaves give mild, onion-like flavor to soft cheese, vegetable cocktail, soup. Bulbs are chopped and added to sausage to give delicate onion flavor.

 

  • CORIANDER: Annual. 75 days. One to 2 feet. Hardy, slow germination, but easy-culture. Can be grown with caraway. Plants should be thinned to stand 6 to 8 inches. Odor and flavor of growing foliage is unpleasant. As soon as seed tops are ripe, they're cut off (heavy seeds easily fall to ground if this isn't done), spread to dry, threshed, and stored in tight glass containers. Uses: in bread, cookies, baked apples, stuffing, sausage.

 

  • DILL: Annual. 70 days. Two to 2-1/2 feet. Easy germination and self-sowing. Ten inches between plants. Don't transplant. Stake. Uses: for flavoring pickles; also in soups, stews, cream sauce, potato salad.

 

  • FENNEL: Annual. 60 days. One to 2 feet. Sow in moderately rich soil. Don't transplant. Eight inches between plants. Uses: Stalks can be eaten like celery. Nutmeg-like seeds used on bread, cakes, sauces, in wine.

 

  • MINT: Perennial. Two feet. Spearmint is ordinary garden variety. Best grown from a few plants. Spreads rapidly in medium rich soil. Uses: in lamb and fish sauces, iced-beverages, fruit cup, in currant and mint jelly, in French dressing for salads. Orange and apple mint not as strong as spearmint.

 

  • SAGE: Perennial. 75 days. One to 2 feet. Eight inch spacing. Plant seeds; choose "Garden" variety. Uses: as sage tea, in poultry dressing, sausage, soft cheese. Leaves can be smoked as tobacco.

 

  • SUMMER SAVORY: Annual. 60 days. One foot. Seed germinates easily. Spacing 6 inches. Uses: for flavoring gravies, salads, dressings, stews scrambled eggs and sausage.

 

  • SWEET MARJORAM: Annual. 70 days. Slow germination. Spacing 10 inches (requires shade until well started). Many uses either fresh or dried: in sausage, meat pies, roast lamb, cheese and egg dishes, peas, beans, and tomatoes, in vegetable cocktails.

 

  • THYME: Perennial. 85 days. Six to 12 inches. Plant seeds — thin to about 4 inches. Plants may be divided and reset second spring. When in full bloom, cut, dry, powder by rubbing and store in glass. Uses: green or dried in soups, stews, sausage , gravies, stuffings, with pork, veal, chipped beer, and especially good on lamb or chevon and chicken.

Autumn - North East Planting Guide

  • Asian Greens
  • Broccoli
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Cabbages
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Salad Green
  • Onions
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Celery
  • Garlic
  • Spring Onions
  • Asparagus
  • Peas (May)
  • Rhubarb Crowns
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Aquaponics MASTER CLASS

We could not recommend this course enough for anyone who is interested in getting in to aquaponics or wants to increase there skills set. Both Kaylene and I both loved...

23-06-2017 Hits:3216 King Valley Aquaponics - Blog

Read more

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TIME TO PLANT GARLIC - Here is how.

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